11 Can’t-Miss San Diego Hikes…Most Within 15 Minutes Of Your Door!

Mix San Diego’s ample supply of sunshine with the gorgeous ocean, desert and mountain views and you have the recipe for nearly perfect hiking conditions year-round.

While there are great places to hike within an hour or two drive of the city, from the wilderness of the Cleveland National Forest to the rocky terrain of Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, there are several incredible hikes right in San Diego, too.

Grab your hiking boots, plenty of water and don’t forget the sunscreen; these hikes will fulfill your outdoor adventure dreams!

Beginner Hikes

These hikes are more closely aligned with rugged walks through nature than a true hike up the side of a mountain. If you’re looking for some fresh air without having to climb a mountainside, these are the hikes for you!

1. Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve Trail

For a beginner hike, try the Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve Trail. Stretching seven miles between Sorrento Valley, Mira Mesa and Rancho Penasquitos, the trail highlights an assortment of spectacular scenery in a lush environment that you don’t often see in San Diego. You can discover a waterfall, stream, groves of oak and sycamore trees and a freshwater marsh. Keep an eye out for wildlife who call the preserve home, such as great blue herons, mule deer, bobcats and coyotes, and be sure to avoid the poison oak!

2. Florida Canyon

Balboa Park is the place to be for museums and cultural activities but it’s also home to the Florida Canyon trails. You can access these interconnecting trails near Morley Field and can mix and match to create your own route. Whether you bike or hike,  it’s a fairly easy, dog-friendly hike with clearly marked trails that shouldn’t pose a problem for any hikers.

3. Gonzales Canyon

Gonzales Canyon sits on the very northern edge of San Diego, in the Carmel Valley neighborhood. There are a number of different ways to enter the trail system and quite a variety of terrain and things to see. If you want a more leisurely hike, stay on the main trails in the valley; if you’d like a seriously heart-pumping workout, choose one of the several steep climbs out of the valley up to the neighborhoods surrounding the canyon and pick up the pace a bit – you’ll feel it!

4. East Shepherd Canyon

 

Shade can be difficult to come by on most hikes in San Diego but East Shepherd Canyon in Tierrasanta has many tall eucalyptus trees to provide some relief from the sun. At just 2.5 miles round trip, this is a relatively quick hike with little elevation gain, making it perfect for hikers, and dogs, of any skill level.

5. Tecolote Canyon

Tucked into a narrow valley just east of Mission Bay between Linda Vista and Clairemont, Tecolote Canyon is a peaceful oasis within the city. With 6.5 miles of easily accessible trails, you can leisurely explore the area at your own pace. The relatively flat terrain makes it great for beginner hikers, joggers and bikers. Dogs are allowed on leash.

6. San Elijo Lagoon and Annie’s Canyon Solana Beach

The majority of the seven miles of trails that pass through the San Elijo Lagoon in Solana Beach are an easy walk for even a novice hiker but the narrow paths through Annie’s Canyon can be a bit trickier to navigate. The coastal wetlands setting provides a great backdrop for bird watching. If you’re looking for more of an adventure, take the 1.5-mile trail to explore the towering sandstone walls that line Annie’s Canyon. Bring your dog along if you plan to stick to the simple walk through the lagoon but leave the pup at home if you want to check out Annie’s Canyon as some of the areas would be a difficult climb for your four-legged friend.

7. Cabrillo National Monument Bayside Trail

As the only national park in San Diego, Cabrillo National Monument is definitely a spot to add to your list of places to visit. While many people visit to see the lighthouse and museum, there’s also an easy two-mile trail that allows you to view the park from a different perspective. The cliffside trail offers beautiful views of Coronado and downtown San Diego. Unlike most hikes, you’ll start this hike by heading downhill so be sure to save up some energy for the return uphill hike. Since the entire elevation gain is under 400 feet, the hike is still considered an easy trek though. It’s the perfect trail for a family hike but unfortunately, dogs aren’t allowed on this one. There is a $5 fee per vehicle to enter the park.

Moderate to Advanced Hikes

Looking for a bit of a challenge or at least hoping to break a sweat? These hikes provide an uphill battle that will give you a good workout while also providing some stunning San Diego views.

8. Cowles Mountain

Located just east of the city near San Carlos, Cowles Mountain is a favorite local hike of many San Diegans. With a fairly short distance of just over a mile one way and elevation gain of fewer than 1,000 feet, this is one of the easier hikes on our list to complete and still get an incredible view. It consists mainly of switchbacks that eventually lead you to the summit. On nice days, you can easily see the Pacific Ocean, despite being miles from the beach, and views of downtown. Don’t forget to bring your pup on this dog-friendly hike! For a less busy hiking trail, be sure to check out the other peaks in the Mission Trails Regional Park. Opt for an early morning hike to avoid heat and find parking!

9. Torrey Pines State Beach

Considering that you literally start this hike at the shores of the Pacific, the Torrey Pines State Beach hike is, without question, a quintessential San Diego hike. You can either walk up the paved road to the top of the hill or find the sandy path at beach level that winds through the cliffs to the top. Once you reach the flattened peak there’s a variety of trails that you can explore. Many loop around and offer a glimpse at the native flora and, of course, the stunning view of the ocean. Since Torrey Pines is a protected area, dogs aren’t allowed and you must stay on the designated paths.

10. Iron Mountain

For a moderate hike that will get your blood pumping, Iron Mountain is the way to go. This Poway-based hike starts off easy with a relatively flat walk along a lovely tree-lined path before climbing up the mountain. As you ascend, you’ll enjoy lovely views of the rocky countryside below and can see many local landmarks on a clear day. Altogether, the hike spans six miles and ascends 1,500 feet. Dogs will appreciate the workout of this hike so don’t forget to bring your canine companion along!

11. Mount Woodson and Potato Chip Rock

It’s likely a safe bet to say that the majority of San Diegans either have a picture of themselves perched on the precarious-looking sliver of Potato Chip Rock or know someone with this infamous photo. Although the 3.5-mile one-way trek from Lake Poway can be a tough hike with an almost 3,000-foot elevation gain, the photo opportunity at the top makes it worth it.

The destination attracts so many visitors that there’s often a line on the weekends to take photos but perhaps you can use the wait to draw inspiration from the creative poses of the people ahead of you. Aside from a single tree offering a shady oasis about halfway up the trail, there’s very little protection from the sun on this hike. Adventurous dogs are welcome to join on this hike too!

We live in the most glorious of cities; get out there, San Diego!